Sep 292016
 

slowdownIs it my imagination or have things started to stagnate in the world of Educational Technology? The leaps and bounds by which we were moving a few years back seem to have become baby steps. People’s blog post seem to lack the excitement over technology they use to have; Twitter threads seem to just rehash the same old Edtech ideas and there hasn’t been a new application released in at least two years that are worth being excited about. Even the hardware we get these days seems to lack any sort of groundbreaking innovation.

It would seem to me that we have hit the wall in the world of educational technology and I am not sure when we can expect the next great leap forward. Perhaps this is just a sign that the world of Educational Technology is maturing. EdTech has become mundane and boring, not unlike the way my own children view my existence.  I serve a purpose, but I am hardly something that is worth getting excited about, but this lull may actually be a blessing. IF we have entered a time of respite from the never-ending bombardment of the latest and greatest in education, perhaps we can now settle down and begin the hard work of developing the curriculum, resources and skills necessary to make effective use of the technology we have.

One of the biggest battles we Edtech “experts” have encountered over the past several years, was convincing classroom teachers to try new technology, but classroom teachers didn’t have the time or inclination to keep up with the merry-go-round of technological change. Many teachers felt it was a fool’s game to even try, but with this slowdown, we actually get a chance to catch-up.  The irony here is that this slowdown, might end up being the opportunity we have been waiting for to move ahead with educational technology.

If we are to capitalize on this EdTech lull, a concerted effort will have to be made, in four specific areas: Leadership, Teachers, Resources & Curriculum and Professional development. It is in these interrelated areas where the use of educational technology needs to be planned for and ultimately implemented in an effective and responsible manner.

  1. Leadership – Someone, or a group of someone’s, need to take advantage of this time we have been given and actively create the opportunities that teachers need, to begin to learn how to best utilize the technology they have at their disposal. This leadership needs to come from government, administration and from the teachers themselves through their Specialist Associations and within school districts. If leadership fails to meet their responsibility to teachers, by not creating  time for collaboration, professional development and mentorship; when the next surge of technological advancement comes, educators will only be left even further behind.
  2. Teachers – Ultimately the successful implementation of educational technology into the classroom will be up to teachers and in order for this to happen, they will have to avail themselves of the opportunities that their leadership provide them. Most teachers I know are more than happy to learn more about how they can utilize technology more effectively in their teaching. When willingness meets opportunity, progress is made.
  3.  Resources and Curriculum – Now is the time to create the resources and curriculum teachers need to properly utilize modern technology in the classroom. Since we are no longer chasing the latest in technological advancements, we have the opportunity to develop the resources and curriculum needed to properly integrate technology in the classroom. The question then becomes, who will do this development? For jurisdictions where curriculum and resources are no longer developed or distributed by an education ministry, this development will have to be done by teachers themselves, or by third-party curriculum developers.
  4. Professional development – As I mentioned with leadership, teachers need to be provided time and opportunity to develop the skills necessary to effectively implement technology in their classroom. There has always been opportunities in the realm educational technology, but much of it plays to the converted and does not reach the non-techie teacher. With this break in the EdTech gotta-have madness, there is an opportunity to reach the masses and not come across looking like you’re just schlepping some new pyramid-scheme product. The most important part about this professional development is that it cannot come in the form of big glitzy conferences. It has to be provided on a local level, aimed at providing practical applications for all classroom teachers.

Now with all this said… Maybe I am way out to lunch. Perhaps we are still moving ahead at light speed, but my four points of EdTech integration still stand. Without proper attention in the four aforementioned areas. Education Technology will never become the domain of the mainstream teacher.

 

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