Dec 082013
 

pylogoAfter 8 months of searching… I think I have found my Coding in the Classroom solution. What I was looking for was a product that gave me a means of some semblance of classroom control but gave the students the flexibility of an open learning environment. I also needed a product that gave me the confidence in saying “this is the one” to students, parents and administration.

What I have come to after months of searching is a Learn to Code solution called Grok Learning out of Australia. They have developed an all in one learn to code platform using Python as their first  offering and from what I have played with thus far, it looks to be a tight little package.

Being a coding neophyte myself, I needed something I could learn quickly along side my students but at the same time had enough complexity and sophistication to challenge the aspiring Wozniaks in the room. From what I have read, Python is apparently the way to go. It is easy to learn, teaches good coding practices and is similar enough to the C languages that learning C & C++ is easier once Python is in the bag. Besides, if Python is good enough for Google and NASA, I am guessing it is probably good enough for a high school classroom.

Some of the things I like about Grok are the following:

  • Browser based
  • Created by educators
  • No installations needed
  • Affordable(ish) $30 a head
  • Easy to set up online classroom
  • Student tracking and marking ready
  • Discussion forums to hash out coding challenges
  • Competitions to challenge students
  • Growing selection of tutorials
  • Downloadable resources
  • Custom courses available
  • Parenting Dashboard
  • Worked on my iPad
  • Live help

When speaking to the good folks of Grok, I mentioned that Canadian educators need an online classroom environment that doesn’t require ANY student information in order to comply with our privacy laws and they seemed to be willing to make that happen. As it stands, a teacher could still set up aliases for each kid and still be within the law.

The question you may now be asking is how Grok Learn To Code is different or better than the products already available? and to be honest, I am not completely sure. I have only just begun to play but at this point what I do like is the following.

Bang for buck – I originally looked at Code School. They provide a wide selection of courses, a really good delivery system and “team” discounts. Unfortunately, the cost is just way to much to ask kids or the school to pay. Sure if I was a good teacher, I would shell out the cash for it myself but I am a selfish sort and prefer to feed my kids so I passed

There are some Great Free Resources out there as well such as Code Academy, which my class is using now. They provide a very similar product to Grok including Python but it doesn’t give the teacher the opportunity to create an online classroom or delve into Python quite as deeply as Grok. In my opinion the ability to manage students under a single back-end interface is invaluable but being able to challenge the higher end kids is imperative. Grok also provides a unique level of support and opportunity for kids to interact with other young coders from around the world.

So after 6 short months and a long intensive search, I think I have come to a decision. it has been really quite astonishing how many learn to code options have come out of the woodwork while I have been looking. All offer a decent learn to code experience but at this moment… I think I will give Grok Learning a go for my coding program.

If anyone would like to give Grok a FREE trial run, they have given me 5 teacher subscriptions to give away. The first 5 insightful comments on this post will receive a link to join Grok.

Cheers,

Keith

 

Apr 172013
 

I apologize but the original post has been removed for circumstances beyond my control.

If you want to participate in an excellent discussion on the topic, go to Linked In and search in the

Technology Integration in Education Digital technology into the classroom

Feb 152013
 

I am elated to introduce the single best tablet ever designed for the classroom. Finally we have something that works the way a Classroom Tablet should… I give you the EDUTAB

kpad

Features


case

 

Construction

  • Encased in carbon fiber
  • Godzilla Glass! Like Gorilla Glass but 10 x stronger
  • Water resistant
  • Field study ready
Entire Network Network Capable

  • Each tablet networked the way you want
  • Microsoft & Novell Network Compatible
  • Multi User profile logins from 2 to ∞
  • H Drive accessible
Groups2 Complete File Freedom

  • Up or download files
  • Share files from device to device
  • Move files from device to networked drive
  • Move files from device to cloud
  • Share files between applications
Print (1) Wireless Printing anywhere anytime

  • Print to any shared printer over a Wi-Fi network
wireless WiFi Enabled

  • WiFi Syncing capable with network or desktop
  • Non Proprietary WiFi Projection
Bluetooth Bluetooth

  • Connect keyboard
  • Tether your data enabled phone
  • Connect to other bluetooth enabled devices
google_desktop Google Tools Friendly

  • Google Drive
  • Google +
  • Google Apps for Education
apps Full complement of productivity Apps

  • Document creation
  • Presentation creation
  • Math tools
  • Science tools
  • Reference materials
flash Flash Support

  • Need I say more
Browser Fully Functioning Browser

  • Reduce the need for apps
  • Freedom to roam the web
Video Multi Media Capable

  • Video editing
  • Audio editing
  • Podcast ready
  • YouTube Friendly
preferences_desktop_keyboard Physical Keyboard

  • External keyboard capable
  • Physical attachment
  • Bluetooth connection
1360883378_Library_Black E Reader Ready

  • Multi format capable
  • Annotation capable
  • Read access from Network Drive (required less storage space)

Player Volume
Audio

  • Dolby 5.1 output
  • Universal mic input (built in condenser)
camera_video Camera

  • Still & Video ready
  • 8 Mega Pixel
  • Front and back
usbflashcardwithcardreader2 USB & Memory ports

  • Expandable SD memory slot
  • Easy connect micro USB
  • Compatible with all operating systems
  • Transfer files by drag and drop
  • Great for pushing out network images
1360998829_battery_two_thirds Battery Life

  • 10+ hour battery life
1361003386_money_bag Cost

  • 16G $250
  • 32G $350
  • Institutional lease options
  • Bulk purchase discounts

Cool Eh! And then I woke up.

Device makers have yet to come to grips with what educators need out of a digital device.

I am quite certain that an educator, has never been involved in the design of any tablet on the market today. The utility of the tablet as a classroom device, continues to be more of a function of marketing than design.

The classroom is a flexible, ever-changing and frequently unpredictable place and as such, digital devices need to be able to keep up and roll with the needs of the student and teacher as they arise. The confines of a device’s limitations or lack there of, is the true measure of its value as a learning tool.

A multinational’s vision of what a classroom should look like, matters not. We need to remember, they are selling devices not education. What I have listed above is what I need as a teacher in a dynamic digitally driven classroom. I don’t care about proprietary posturing and protection of trade secrets. Give me something that does what I want it to do, when I want it done. No restrictions, no workarounds, just pure unadulterated classroom utility.

Happy Weekend.

Reader Additions To The Ultimate Tablet

people Multi User Profiles

  • User profiles that are not tied to network
  • Provide different access and rights to groups or individuals
  • Student – Teacher – Parent

Shared by @_valeriei & @KEgilsson

Radix_SmartClass_Teacher_students_laptops_control_management_small

image credit Radix Management

Classroom Management Tools

  • Control and manage a class set of devices
  • Push out content to class simultaneously
  • interact and evaluate with students on the fly

Shared by Michael from Radix classroom management system

 

 

Sep 292011
 

What a great week! Glad it is over and I can get ready for a great weekend but not before I throw up a new post.

If you read last weeks blog, I am sure you are waiting on baited breath to hear how this weeks meeting with the iPad teachers went. As far as meetings go it wasn’t too shabby and as it turns out, the past three weeks with the iPad kids went quite well too. As expected, everyone had both positive things to say and some frustrations to report.  Unfortunately this blog post will focus on one universal frustration which has dogged all of use these past three weeks.

Virtually every teacher at our meeting had the same niggling question. What is the best way to collect work from the kids? We have all struggled with trying to find an effective way for kids to submit completed assignments. As I had said last week, we have all resorted to having the kids email their work to us but the consensus is that another way has to be found.

The whole thing serves to illustrate just how important paper has been in sharing information over the centuries . Paper is a simple and effective way to transfer knowledge and demonstrate understanding. Paper has been the common currency of education and part of the the daily transactions between student and teacher for generations. It would seem however, that this important part of the educational process was not identified by the good people at Apple. It is my opinion that this is something that the iPad MUST be able to do before it could be considered an educational tool.

Now don’t get me wrong, it is undeniable that the iPad is a powerful learning tool and we are finding new and exciting ways to use it on a daily basis BUT the inability to easily complete the most basic of transactions between student and teacher, suggests that the ipad wasn’t really designed as an educational tool.

What we have discovered is that the iPad is fantastic for dispensing information to the user whether it be text, video or audio. Students can even produce some cool stuff to prove that they have acquired the concepts we are trying to impart but it is that missing link between student and teacher. The centuries old exchange which makes up the economy of education has somehow been overlooked or perhaps purposely left out by Apple.

By meetings end, we had decided to approach Apple directly to see if they had an “educational expert” on staff who could address our frustrations and perhaps suggest some solutions. As of Friday at 3 PM we have not heard back but we are hopeful.

So, as of weeks end,  I remain thankful that I have been given the opportunity to break new ground in the rapidly changing landscape of education. With any luck, if I continue to bellyache on a weekly basis, I may even influence the way we teach children in the years to come.